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20130104
20130112
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CSPAN2 9
MSNBCW 5
CSPAN 2
CNN 1
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
MSNBC
Jan 11, 2013 2:00pm PST
right decides to make an argument that is insane, they jump on the civil rights movement or slavery and try to latch their argument onto the history -- >> yes. >> as if they give a damn. as if they would have been up at the front for the fight. >> exactly. >> you don't remember ted nugent standing in front of everyone m the civil rights marches. >> i remember him refusing to go to vietnam. i remember him getting out of going to vietnam and being afraid to carry a gun when his country asked him to carry a gun. he was a coward. these guys always jump on slavery and the civil rights movement. ths offensive. if slaves hadn't been owned by other people there wouldn't have been slavery either. >> this is what's happening now is something we've been talking about for five years. that is the extreme right, let's call it what it is, has gone on about barack obama as a socialist, as -- conspiracy theories about secret plans to take guns and dominate the country, and now because biden comes out and talks about high-capacity magazines they say finally, we finally have something -- >> nailed the
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2013 5:15pm EST
point to point as we were advised by my iconic hero, a civil-rights hero, first assessments of rice division. he was to have as much freedom as any other student. well, yes. but at the same time there are deer hunters, and it was the season, and we were constantly aware of who might come upon to the campus. did not look like a student, had been to mine in a deer rifle and we had to be constantly aware of that kind of threat to his life. a brave person. i was sitting in his dormitory room the first couple of days reading the hate mail, the death threats. a very detailed. we know where you live, or your parents are. or going to kill you, your tolerance. and i looked at janzen said to have you read this one. he looked back and said the limelight from a spanish class. let's go. that can the bridge every state with him in that kind of courage stayed with him throughout my association with him. he never crack troubling to. the students plan to. i should say that 99 percent of the student body went about their weight inning and education. they cared little about him being on the campus. to
MSNBC
Jan 6, 2013 7:00am PST
. how do we build a democratic party in the south without giving up civil rights, women's reproductive rights and build a big tent? >> i would remind us of one word, work. that's what's ahead of us. we have a path. we have seen nationally that i think the presidency favors democrats. the real work is going to be exactly where you pointed out, state legislatures. in 2010, we vis rate at the gubernatorial level. in 2010, we got killed. we have to build that back and we need to put together a concrete plan to take the house. we have to stay in the future business. by that, the republicans continue to practice the politics of subtraction. that's a losing strategy nationally. it's not impacted them locally. it's up to local democrats to say we are the one who is care about the middle class. we are the ones who don't encourage vaginal probes for women -- >> unless they want them. >> we are the ones who try to make sure african-americans have the right to vote. we are the ones who believe in the dream act. we are the ones who believe in inclusion for gay and lesbians. >> it's a messaging piec
CSPAN
Jan 7, 2013 5:00pm EST
. during the civil rights movement he was kind of a hero of mine. much more so than martin luther king, because i was quite of a radical as a young person, and i was the one that thought we should shall overcome is not a effective way of gaining civil rights. i think i i thought that more confrontation was needed. >> host: what made you a radical? what does it mean? >> guest: i think a radical, -- i'm still a radical today. that is i believe that a radical is any person who believes in the official liberty and individual freedom and limited government. that makes you a radical. and i have always been a -- person who believe that people should not we are interfere with me. i should be able to do my own thing as long as i don't violate the rights other people. >> host: who is the difference of following malcom x. omar tin luther king? >> host: well, at that time i thought martin luther king was too much a compriseer. i was willing to demand people in my career in the army was a part of that vision of confronting racial discrimination. >> host: how tall are you? >> guest: six foot fight.
MSNBC
Jan 3, 2013 4:00pm PST
there for reasons related to civil rights and seniority went into the republican party. and race began to fall away as the organizing principle in life. so the parties became more ideological separate from one another. democrats agreeing with democrats, republicans agreeing with republicans. as that happened, they began to act as units. we don't have a political system set up very well for parties to act as units. the founders didn't want there to be parties at all. they were very against factions even though they went on to create a number of them. the 112th was a culmination of a lot of trends we've been seeing over the last 40 or 50 years. and the composition of the congress in which you had a republican speaker from the republican minority in the house. you had a very slim democratic majority in the senate that was subject to the filibuster and a democratic president the republicans were trying to defeat was a perfect cocktail for this paralysis and polarization but i'm not optimistic about the 113th because even if they do try to do things through regular order, these same underlying dynamics
CSPAN
Jan 5, 2013 6:00pm EST
funded runaway slaves. she actually--some of the early landmark civil rights cases in california she funded. and then--and near the end of her life, things became even more bizarre. she was sort of connected to a very wealthy senator from--state senator from california and was taken to court and so it just becomes, you know, this saga. but as a figure, i mean, she's just inspirational and just formidable. c-span: $30, 643 pages for your book. where did you write it? >> guest: wrote it all over the world. i actually--you know, i was in north carolina after i did the initial traveling, i did some there. i went to new york where i had been living for 13 years. c-span: what were you doing in new york? >> guest: well, i taught at columbia and sarah lawrence college. i was for a year at the university--i'm sorry--at the american academy in rome, the rome prize. so that was where the bulk of it was actually completed. and oxford, mississippi, where i was a writer in residence. so i've toted around a lot of papers for a lot of years. c-span: faulkner does come up in your book. he used to liv
FOX
Jan 11, 2013 7:00am EST
forward as well. >> this has been through the ages, active in the women's suffrage movement and civil rights movement. >> yes. >> from the beginning. >> yes, we are founded on january 13, 1913 at howard, and the first act of the founders was to participate in the suffrage march, in march of 1913. >> we're showing here prominent deltas through the years, as we mark this centennial event. >> so many who have been a part of our organization. they've gone on of course, of course, to do great things in their life. they started out with us. barbara jordan ran for financial secretary of the sorority before she became famous. >> right. moving forward here, what do you see as the main mission? you have this wonderful grassroots movement. >> right. >> with women who are dedicated to making our communities better, the community at large better. what do you see moving forward now? >> as we celebrate, because we're having a myriad of events this year. >> yeah. >> started with the float in the rose bowl parade, where we're not only celebrating history, but making history at the same time, by being
MSNBC
Jan 11, 2013 3:00pm PST
that is not republican or democrat. but they're inclined to vote for gun control and side with what is the civil and right thing to do. >> yeah, i think melissa makes an important point. 38 republicans back in '94, when the assault weapons ban was originally passed, it's since expired, 38 different republicans voted for it. i think a lot of those republicans from the northeast, particularly from new york and pennsylvania, a lot of these republicans know there's a problem for them and a problem for their party. if the entire tone of the party is set by the most right wing members, many of them from the south. and so we'll never get anything done on this unless there is significant support from republicans. and there does seem to be developing support from them particularly on the big ban on the magazines and universal background checks. >> so that would be a big development. if they are talking about supporting and really going against the grain of these more right wingers, that means that we may have enough votes to really get something significantly done? >> i absolutely think that's what's goi
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2013 7:00am EST
, fight. we are millions of people just like you. we are the longest standing civil rights organization in the u.s. of history's s patriots, prbotectors of the second amendment advocating the right to keep and bear arms. advancing the shooting sports. championing gun safety, education and training. creating a vital legacy by answering freedom's call. and we are growing stronger every day. we are the n.r.a. and the n.r.a. is you. host: that is from the n.r.a. two stories you can find online and front page of the leading newspapers. "new york times" looking at symbols of grief piling up. from the "washington post" broad strategy on guns being weighed far beyond the ban on assault weapons. they are on their websites. we will continue the conversation on the agenda ahead as lawmakers return the start of the 113th congress. president back in washington later t today. later, looking at just what members of congress earn, pensions and salary. we will have more with daniel shuman of the sunlight foundation. keeping track of other programs. good morning, nancy. >> good morning, steve. on today's
CSPAN
Jan 11, 2013 9:00am EST
produce, it is a little murky. i'm not so sure whether you are concerned about the civil rights of the prisoners or the fact that guantanamo bay itself is something the u.s. should not keep open. -- listening to you, it is a little murky. so my question, is it closing guantanamo bay or giving justice to the people and the 186 people? when you go on that track, and everybody loses track of what is really the issue. >> i don't understand the distinction. it's not just to hold people indefinitely without. guantanamo is the symbol of that. you've got to get them out of there and close it. >> i don't want to get in an argument. >> your first point about the cost, not the economic cost that you can put a dollar figure on but the cost to america, the intangible cost. i think we saw that not long ago with the man extradited from the u.k. to america. i guess the u.k. is our closest allies in the war on terror and our closest ally made us promise that before they would extradite him we would not send them to guantanamo, that he would not be prosecuted in the military commission, which to
CSPAN
Jan 4, 2013 11:00pm EST
in the civil rights movement. others have been working in the movement since 1961. i.t. is about it now. he had not come to baker county to help get the movement started there. but once my father, who was a leader in the community with murder, that was one thing that brought everyone together, and they were ready when they came in to help us, the baker county movement. >> wow. what's the interesting part to me is in the book you really write about the way that the legacy impacts you. so you talk about the fact that when that happened, the black children lost father by friends found themselves living in this no man's land and we didn't get the chance to really feel the price of those young folks paid in order for us to be where we are. we know it intellectually, but we don't get to see that. and that is something that the book really does beautifully. >> we started the movement in june of 1965. in august of 1965, about 15 others and my sister decided to integrate the white schools. i can remember the first day. i had graduated and was going off to college in september. and we took them -- we tri
CSPAN
Jan 9, 2013 8:00pm EST
that complies with civil rights, but, of course, has an overriding effect of addressing public safety. we had a lot of testimony. we had a lot of speaking out proand con from law enforcement throughout the campaign in colorado about implications and whether moving towards legalization was better or worse than the status quo. i worked my own career in law enforcement and prosecution, there's disagreement. i mean i heard passionate disagreement from a lot of people i respect. well, one thing we have to do now is have a standard that protect people who visit our state and drive on the roads so people know that that's -- there is going to be a safe system for them, and we're not sure yet how to do that. our legislature has that as job one now in the new session that starts this week in colorado, and your point of vu, your input would be valuable in our state. >> against legalization in colorado; is that right? >> i was opposed to it. i also publicly predicted it would not pass. my credibility is nil. [laughter] >> i have to say i support this, and i predicted it to pass. [laughter] i think, you k
FOX News
Jan 7, 2013 10:00am PST
vii of the civil rights act makes it unlawful to discriminate based on gender. a distinction saying that women are the problem they should be fired or what the iowa supreme court found was that this particular woman is a problem because right or wrong, justified or not, she poses a threat to the marriage. and that was the basis for him firing her. >> what about that, what is the dentist supposed to do when he feels attraction for her, he's a married man and the wife says she's got to go and the law says you have to keep her in your employ? >> yes, it does and i'm looking at the opinion right now. the court absolutely got this wrong. section 2116 of the iowa code says it's unlawful to discriminate based on sex and may have a devastating impact based on sex. >> it's not. >> the cases that the court cited that you brought up had to do where an employee and an employer had a consensual sexual relationship. that didn't happen here so those cases aren't on point. >> would the position be the same, a male employer found a male employee too hot and fired him. >> megyn: hold that thought and
CSPAN
Jan 8, 2013 12:00pm EST
that standard going to be and how are going to test people in a way that complies with the civil rights but, of course, has the overriding effect of addressing public safety. we had a lot of testimony. we had a lot of speaking out pro and con for law enforcement throughout the campaign in colorado. about public safety implications and whether moving toward legalization was better or worse than the status quo. i appreciate your point that i would tell you i suppose worked a lot on my own career in law enforcement and prosecution, there's disagreement. i've heard passionate disagreement from a lot of people i respect. one thing we have to do now is come up with a standard that will protect people who come and visit our state and drive on the roads so that people know that there is going to be a safe system for them. and we're not sure yet how to do that to our legislature has this as job one that starts this next week in colorado. i think your point of view, your input would be really valuable in our state. >> you are against legalization and colorado, is that right? >> yesterday i was suppos
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2013 12:00pm EST
and corporate america isn't somehow reined in, there will be massive civil disobedience in this country. >> host: all right, john, we got your point. thank you. mr. barlett, response for that caller. >> guest: well, there's a lot there. and you could, you could do a whole book on the federal reserve. actually, bill greider a few years ago did a really fairly decent job on the federal reserve. one thing that i've learned over the years is don't talk about something you haven't spent any time studying. and so i just don't know. is that a fruitful area to look at? absolutely. and especially when you look now, because now it's being driven home to me that you can have massive debt without high interest rates, which is something i didn't think would ever occur. i'm talking about the federal government. because if you went back, you know, back into the greenspan era, the government interest rate, the government was paying 16, 17%. and you kept, you keep looking at the size of this growth, and you say, wow, this is impressive, 2, 3%? i don't know. i don't know what the -- i don't know how that's explai
CNN
Jan 10, 2013 4:00am PST
. but the worst of the storm is being felt in syria where civil war forced thousands to live in dire conditions in refugee camps and makeshift shelters without heat. a lost suffering for people already suffering. >>> all right. john. thank you. when we come back, a.j. hammer head of "showbiz tonight." we'll have announcement and reaction and insiders and the host himself. seth mcfarland will join us after the announcements are made.  >>> if we're going go, we need to go now. >> you feel right? the whole world is going want in on this. >> this moment, now, now, now! ♪ >> they got my wife and they sold her, but i don't know who took her. >> yes! whoo! >>> special coverage of the academy award nominations on "starting point" begins right now. ♪ >> morning, everybody. we're taking a live look from the samuel goldwyn theater. in beverly hills. welcome to our coverage. a.j. hammer is geg to help us out, he's the host of "showbiz tonight." on headline news. interesting, hard to say who will be nominated. >> the exciting thing for me, terrific movies, these are movies peo
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)